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Top 5 designers and collections on Day 3 of LMIFW SS’19

by Anjori Grover Vasesi

13-October-2018  |  8 mins read

Top 5 designersDay 3 at the Lotus Makeup India Fashion Week Spring Summer 2019, explored India’s ongoing affair with traditional Indian crafts and techniques, and handloom fabrics. Most designers who showcased today explored age-old celebrated processes such as hand block printing, tie and dye effects, hand-loom extra weft technique, ikat and shibori work, and Chikankari and Daraz work over progressive silhouettes that seamlessly fuse tradition with modernity.

Easy-breezy silhouettes are the hack of the hour and the favourite shape of the season, used feely to tap on the gen Z and millennial jet-setting wardrobe. The future consumer- who prefers comfort and utility over everything else, has been kept in mind while carefully creating collection that serve the need of the hour. Though repetitive, newness was ushered in thanks to surface techniques such as embroidery and prints, keeping the traditional crafts in mind.

The stand out of the day included a presentation by celebrated Japanese designer, Atsushi Nakashima, who after showcasing at fashion weeks the world over, has presented his artistic style in India for the very first time. Making use of a special material crafted out of premium and luxurious artificial leather, called Ultrasuede, the designer presented a collection high on 60s art and music.

Scroll ahead to discover the best look from the top 5 collections worth noting for their intricacies and adherence to theme, at the LMIFW SS’19 edition…

LOVEBIRDS

LOVEBIRDS

Concepts of volume, circular form and asymmetry are explored at Lovebirds SS’19 collection. Known for blending minimal concepts with hand-crafted processes and materials, the brand updates traditional satin organza in unexpected new silhouettes. Techniques such as block printing over non-synthetic and handwoven cottons, linens and silks utilize the sustainable notion of natural dyeing processes, contributing to the quality of the garments. Linear elements such as stripes are paired with strong prints to complement the cuts and layering techniques featured across the collection.

PAYAL PRATAP

PAYAL PRATAP

Evocative of vocative of Robert Frost’s sentiment “the woods are lovely dark and deep”, the Pratap presents a collection of chic separates, played around by with layering to explore the secrets of the forest, the solace and beauty in the silence that lives among the dense untamed undergrowth. Vintage twig and branch prints, fern and foliage prints, water colour hand painted ivy prints, and a melange of checks, ginghams, and stripes come alive in a colour palette of forest greens, rhubarb pinks, wild mustard, tan and coffee and pigment blue. Techniques such as tie dye processes, signature cross stitch with ferns, branch and twig motifs, French knotting, cut work and scalloping at the hems, and a subtle detailing of fern and foliage embroideries lend a 3D element to the entire collection.

Silhouettes take the form of asymmetric hems and plackets, pleating techniques, maxi dresses, and peplums in handloom linen cotton and khadi fabrics. Layering in the form of overlays and sheers appear as breathable and airy summer jackets and Zouave jumpsuits.

Accessories include handmade peep-toe footwear in soft leather and hand cut forest log hoops and bangles and bags- basket weave bags updated with fern and foliage patchwork that tap onto the vacation wardrobe aptly in tune with the jet-setting consumer of today.

AMRICH

AMRICH

Linear patterns come alive over natural fabrics and elegant cuts at Amrich’s Spring Summer 2019 collection. Versatile easy-breezy separates make for a transitional day to night wardrobe comprising of exquisite hand-made textiles in hand-spun cottons, silks and silk cotton blends.

The label utilizes age-old textile techniques such as hand-loom extra weft, ikat and shibori and over elegant silhouettes set to compliment the female body form.

RAHUL MISHRA

RAHUL MISHRA

“Fashion, to me, is an expression of what makes me. As a nostalgist, I want to bring back the 1980s in colour.”

For his Spring Summer 2019 collection titled ‘GOSSAMER’, Mishra drew inspiration from a nostalgic childhood and the everyday things one comes in contact with while growing up, that somehow get etched in our memory… “When I was shopping for curtains for my home, I stumbled upon the Daraz work on white bedcovers. I cut them up to make curtains. And I remembered the great steel trunk where my mother stored these white curtains and pillows with Daraz work, a craft that is dying now. I remembered the weavers who wore the blue and white chequered lungis. I remembered my grandmother who wore Maheshwari saris and cotton lungis. And that’s how I began to explore my intimate relationship with the things of my childhood – the pillow covers, the curtains, the table cloth.” Mishra explained.

He incorporated the craft of Chikankari and Daraz work in his collection that featured westernized silhouettes in the form of long dresses, jackets, asymmetrical skirts and coordinated lace embroidered lounging sets. Fine cotton woven in West Bengal and Maheshwari textiles with their blue and white checks are an ode to the memory of the village Mishra spent his time growing up in and also to his growth as a designer whilst working with weavers.

The textile development for the collection has its own narrative that emerges from the collection’s theme. Gossamer, is the thin thread spiders produce to make webs. The designer has referenced these threads to the memory from which he has woven this collection.

ATSUSHI NAKASHIMA

ATSUSHI NAKASHIMA

After showcasing across multiple fashion weeks internationally, the showcase marks the first time celebrated Japanese designer Atsushi Nakashima presents at India. Dubbed ‘REVIVAL’, the collection taps on 60’s aesthetic of fashion and music, bringing psychedelic prints and colourways to the fore. Materials that are 100% Made in Japan feature over expertly tailored suits, bags and dresses. Details such as original lace and knit update the 60’s aesthetic with a new take on traditional dressing, whilst a special material crafted out of premium and luxurious artificial leather, Ultrasuede, is processed by laser to make the brand’s logo stand out over surfaces.

For his SS’19 collection, Nakashima has incorporated the technique of nano-coating for the first time as a custom-made suit maker.